Skip to Content

Perfect 7-10 Day Kenya Safari Itinerary & Costs

Kenya is one of the most popular destinations for an Africa safari. And, after spending almost a month going on safari in different parks across Kenya, I can see why!

Kenya is a diverse country in terms of wildlife, culture and landscapes. From the vast plains of the Masai Mara (perfect big cat territory!) to breathtaking views of Mount Kilimanjaro from Amboseli (a park renowned for its elephant population), there really is something for every safari enthusiast.

Cheetah mother Nashipai with two of her four cubs in the Masai Mara, Kenya
Cheetah mother Nashipai with two of her four cubs in the Masai Mara, Kenya

To get the most out of this beautiful country, I’d highly recommend visiting Kenya for at least 7 days.

In this guide, I’m going to dive into the ultimate 7-10 day Kenya safari itinerary. My goal is to provide you with everything you need to know, including costs, how to find the perfect tour operator and more, so that you can plan the safari of a lifetime!

Plan Your Safari Adventure

Save time and ensure an incredible experience from the local safari companies I use to organise my own trips.

I’m here to make booking your perfect safari quick, easy and risk-free. It takes less than 1 minute to fill out the form and in under 48 hours you will receive multiple, no-obligation proposals from my favourite local tour operators with glowing online reviews.

Kenya Safari Itinerary Map

7-10 day Kenya safari itinerary map
Map: © OpenStreetMap
Male lion in the Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya
A stunning young male lion in the Masai Mara National Reserve

Why Go on Safari in Kenya?

Kenya is a great place for first-time safari-goers for a number of reasons.

First of all, Kenya is home to one of the largest international airports in Africa, meaning access to the country is easy and doesn’t involve excessive flights. For example, you can fly directly from London and Amsterdam.

Secondly, Kenya is home to some of the best wildlife reserves in the world. It houses the famous Masai Mara which features in countless wildlife documentaries and in the summer is the backdrop to one of the greatest wildlife spectacles on earth – the crossing of millions of wildebeest across the crocodile-infested Mara River.

Additionally, journeying between the different parks and reserves is relatively easy. The distance between them isn’t too great (for example, Tsavo West is just a couple of hours from Amboseli) and if driving for several hours between parks doesn’t sound appealing, all parks are linked up via airstrips.

In terms of wildlife, Kenya has it all. Across its national parks you can find all of the Big Five (lions, elephants, rhinos, leopards and buffalos) as well as a myriad of other wonderful creatures.

Baby giraffe in the Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya
An energetic baby giraffe prances after its mother in the Masai Mara National Reserve

How to Book Your Kenya Safari

Without a doubt the most popular and easiest way to go on safari in Kenya is to book your trip with a local tour operator. This is how I booked my Kenya safari and I was extremely happy. These types of trips are extremely convenient as your tour operator will take care of everything, from booking hotels and permits to giving you up-to-date recommendations on the best places to visit based on recent wildlife sightings.

You can get quotes from the same local tour companies I use to organise my own trips here: Safaris By Ella

Other types of safari are available, including self-drive safaris and fly-in to hotel safaris, where you fly from lodge to lodge and each lodge offers game drives. And of course there are package holidays, where an international travel agent takes care of everything, including international flights.

The option you choose will have a large impact on the price of your safari as well as the experience itself. Below I will provide you with the pros and cons of each option.

Ella McKendrick on Safari in the Masai Mara, Kenya
Me on safari in Kenya with a local tour operator. You can receive quotes from the same tour operators I use here

Option 1: Self-Drive Safari

This option is popular with budget travellers as the perceived costs involved are less than booking through a tour operator.

In reality, however, the cost savings are minimal as you still have to pay for national park permits, hotels, food, car rental and fuel. You simply won’t have a knowledgeable driver guide with you.

For a self-drive safari you will need to organise everything yourself so doing ample research is essential.

Self-drive safaris come with the freedom of travelling in your own time and to your own schedule. However, many of the reserves in Kenya are quite challenging to drive. For example the Masai Mara has a sprawling road network which is extremely difficult to navigate. I’ve heard reports of many self-drivers getting lost in the Mara and needing other vehicles to help them find their way out.

Additionally, on a self-drive safari you cannot benefit from the radio system which safari guides use to alert other vehicles of wildlife sightings and therefore are less likely to have amazing sightings. You can, of course, follow other vehicles (like I did on my self-drive safari in Etosha, Namibia) but this is a little bit of a gamble as the vehicle may be heading to lunch, the restroom or even leaving the park.

Personally, I don’t think a self-drive safari is worth it in Kenya. For countries in Southern Africa such as South Africa and Namibia, self-driving makes perfect sense as there are large cost savings involved and guides are not needed to navigate through the national parks. However, in Kenya, I think the negatives of self-driving outweigh the very minimal cost saving on not having a guide.

Female cheetah in Amboseli National Park in Kenya
A female cheetah in Amboseli National Park. We were able to get to this sighting extremely quickly due to the radio system in our vehicle.

Option 2: Private Local Safari Tour Operator

My personal favourite option is to book with local safari tour operators.

Local operators will typically take care of everything apart from your international flights. This means they will book your hotels, arrange for all meals, pay for safari permits, provide the vehicle, driver guide and fuel for your safari. Personally I find that having so much taken care of makes the trip extremely relaxing.

What swayed me to booking with a local tour operator was the fact that the costs weren’t that much more to booking a safari yourself. For example, often the tour operators get special rates with hotels so you are paying the same amount for the hotels, but just having the hassle of booking it taken away. Additionally, hotels will keep rooms reserved for tour operator bookings so even if a hotel is showing as fully booked online, the tour operators may still be able to get you a room there. So, there’s a couple of additional benefits to booking through a tour operator.

Ella McKendrick on Safari in Amboseli National Park in Kenya
Me thoroughly enjoying my Kenya safari with a local safari tour operator. You can receive quotes from the same tour operators I use here.

However, not all local tour operators are created equal.

At this point I have been on countless safaris with a range of different tour operators and the experience can vary greatly depending on which tour operator you go with.

The cheapest option isn’t always the best. In fact, in my personal experience, it rarely is. Accommodation options are a huge factor in the prices of safari programmes (cheaper programmes often have cheaper hotels) but the quality of other things can slip too. For example, cheaper companies often have less experienced driver guides and this can have a huge impact on the quality of your safari. Less experienced guides won’t be able to point out as much wildlife or take you to the places where wildlife is most likely to be.

It’s extremely important to always check online reviews of a safari tour company and pay particular attention to any negative ones they have.

I’d love to help you choose the perfect local tour operator. You can receive safari quotations from my favourite local tour operators who I have personally been on safari with and had an excellent experience with here on Safaris By Ella.

Recommended Booking Options For Your 7-10 Day Kenya Safari

Private Safari

Most popular & best experience – typical prices start from $300 per person per day.

Visit safarisbyella.com for free quotes from trustworthy local tour companies I use to book my own trips.

Ella Mckendrick with lions in Serengeti

Group (Shared) Camping Safari

Good for budget or solo travellers – from $160 per person per day.

My recommended Kenya tour operators only provide private safaris, however, I’ve listed the best group options for this itinerary, on Safari Bookings below.

Click the links below to request quotes for the group safari options on the safari bookings website.

7-Day Kenya Budget Group Safari Option 1

7-Day Kenya Budget Group Safari Option 2

10-Day Kenya Budget Group Safari

Option 3: Hotel Safaris

Many safari lodges offer their own safari experiences. This is a good choice if you want to be based in the same place for an extended period or if you want to fly from lodge to lodge.

Hotel safaris can often end up being more expensive than booking with local tour operators as they don’t come with transfers from other parks or cities. You will typically have to either arrange these yourself or book them with the hotel which comes at an additional cost. A popular option is flying between safari lodges and then having the lodge transfer you from the airstrip to the lodge which again often comes at an additional cost.

Another drawback of hotel safaris is these are not typically private safaris and you will have to share the safari vehicle with other hotel guests. This gives you less flexibility in terms of which sightings you go to, how long to spend at each sighting and how long to spend on safari as a whole.

Elephants in Amboseli National Park in Kenya
A family of elephants enjoying themselves in a puddle of water in Amboseli National Park. We waited at this spot for a while as our guide knew that the elephants would head this way and get close to the road. Our patience paid off! You can’t always have the flexibility to wait at sightings when on a group safari.

Option 4: Overseas Travel Agents

By far the most expensive way to book your safari is through an overseas tour operator. Overseas tour operators will typically sub-contract the actual safari to a local tour operator but pay a lot more for the safari as you have to cover the travel agent fees as well.

Apart from the fact that overseas travel agents can often book international flights, the end experience will be very similar to booking with a local tour operator.

This is a good option if budget isn’t a concern for you and you want your entire trip taken care of including international flights.

Overview: I’d personally always recommend booking with a local tour operator. In my opinion this option strikes the balance between giving you a rewarding experience and being good value.

You can get quotes from the local tour companies I use to organise my own trips here: Safaris By Ella

Lioness in Amboseli National Park in Kenya
A beautiful lioness in Amboseli National Park

How Much Does a Kenya Safari Cost?

A typically private Kenyan safari costs from $300 per person per day. This includes hotels, park fees, all meals, transfers and all activities on your safari.

Shared group safaris cost slightly less. You can expect to pay around $150 per person per day for these. However, this will give you basic camping accommodation and the campsites are often poorly maintained with questionable facilities.

Below you can view a chart of typical safari costs based on your budget.

Comfort LevelPrice Per Person Per Day7 Days10 Days
Shared BudgetFrom $140 PPFrom $970From $1,400 PP
Private BudgetFrom $300 PPFrom $2100 PPFrom $3,000 PP
Private MidrangeFrom $400 PPFrom $2,800 PPFrom $4,000 PP
Private LuxuryFrom $650 PPFrom $4,550 PPFrom $6,500 PP
Private Luxury +From $1,000 PPFrom $7,000 PPFrom $10,000 PP

Please note that the costs above are for booking through a local operator. Prices will be considerably more expensive if you book through an overseas company or travel agent.

Recommended Booking Options For Your 7-10 Day Kenya Safari

Private Safari

Most popular & best experience – typical prices start from $300 per person per day.

Visit safarisbyella.com for free quotes from trustworthy local tour companies I use to book my own trips.

Ella Mckendrick with lions in Serengeti

Group (Shared) Camping Safari

Good for budget or solo travellers – from $160 per person per day.

My recommended Kenya tour operators only provide private safaris, however, I’ve listed the best group options for this itinerary, on Safari Bookings below.

Click the links below to request quotes for the group safari options on the safari bookings website.

7-Day Kenya Budget Group Safari Option 1

7-Day Kenya Budget Group Safari Option 2

10-Day Kenya Budget Group Safari

Kenya Safari Cost Breakdown

Kenya was once considered a budget-friendly safari destination in comparison to other countries such as Tanzania and Uganda. However, the park fees have recently risen in price and now a Kenyan safari is comparable in price to other countries in East Africa. For example, in peak season it now costs $200 per person per day to enter the Masai Mara for a single safari.

Park fees and hotels take up the bulk of your safari costs. If the Masai Mara costs $200 per person per day and the average hotel near the Masai Mara costs $100 per person per night, you can see how a safari to the best parks can easily exceed $300 per person per day. Remember, there’s still the vehicle, driver guide and fuel costs to be covered too!

Below I’ve included a chart which breaks down where the money goes for a safari of 2 people.

Factors Affecting Kenya Safari Costs

There are a number of factors that can affect the cost of your safari. The most obvious factor is the level of accommodation that you select. A luxury safari will cost a lot more than a budget one. However, there are a couple of other factors to consider.

The size of your group can have a large impact on the total safari cost. Costs for a solo traveller will naturally be a lot more than for a couple. This is because fixed day costs such as the vehicle and driver guide cost can be split amongst a group whereas a solo traveller has to take the full cost. Based on this, the larger your group, the cheaper your safari.

Two zebra stallions battling for dominance in the Masai Mara
Two zebra stallions battling for dominance in the Masai Mara

The vehicle that you select will also have an impact on your Kenya safari cost. There are typically two options for your safari: a minivan or a Toyota Land Cruiser. The Land Cruiser is more expensive than a minivan.

You can upgrade your vehicle further to a photography-ready Land Cruiser which has larger windows that open all the way so that you have even better views of the wildlife. Often these vehicles come with beanbags too to help you get the best photos.

The time of year that you visit can also have a large impact on your overall safari costs. Based on the new park fee pricing it is now substantially cheaper to visit Kenya between January and June. For example, a day safari in Masai Mara costs $100 per person at this time of year. Park fees are double for the second half of the year.

Toyota Land Cruiser surrounded by a buffalo herd in the Masai Mara
A special photographic Toyota Land Cruiser surrounded by a buffalo herd in the Masai Mara

Best time to visit Kenya

Kenya can be visited throughout the year. There’s always something to see, no matter what the season! However, your experience and what you see will be greatly impacted by Kenya’s rains.

The universally-accepted best time to visit Kenya is during the long-dry season, between June and October. Days are warm (not too hot), sunny and dry.

If you’re keen to see the great wildebeest migration then mid-July to late-September is the best time to visit. The wildebeest are in the Serengeti in Tanzania at other times of the year so this is your only chance to catch a glimpse of the great herds.

Wildebeest migration through Mara River Tanzania
The wildebeest migration can be viewed typically between mid-July and late-September

Mid-March to mid-May is often considered the worst time to visit Kenya. This is because this is the long rainy season. Days are wet and the heavy rainfall can make travelling challenging at this time of year. However, weather has been erratic in recent years meaning that sometimes the long rains never arrive at all which makes it as good a time as June to October to visit in terms of weather with the added bonus that the parks are quiet and you can benefit from cheaper safari rates.

Mid-October to mid-December is the short rainy season. This is classed as shoulder season although the park fees don’t reflect it. At this time of year the weather is generally pleasant. You can expect sunny days and light rain showers in the evening. However, things are changing. I visited Kenya during the short rainy season in 2023 and the rains were extremely heavy. It was worse than the long rainy season, they said. However, this didn’t have a negative impact on my experience and the rains actually turned the landscape a beautiful vibrant green. I also loved seeing so many baby animals (rains bring new life)!

A soggy female cheetah sitting in the rain in Amboseli
A soggy female cheetah sitting in the rain in Amboseli in November

January to mid-March is the short dry season. This is arguably the best time of year to visit if you want to strike the right balance between having quieter parks and lower park fees vs having great weather. Low quantities of rain are to be expected at this time of year and you can still benefit from witnessing the beauty of a lush, green wilderness filled with baby animals.

Overview: June to mid-October is considered the best time to visit Kenya. You can still have a good experience at other times of year but may experience some rain.

A leopard known as Luluka feeds on a gazelle kill in the Masai Mara
A leopard known as Luluka feeds on a gazelle kill in the Masai Mara

How Long to Spend in Kenya

In order to view the best of what Kenya has to offer, I’d recommend spending at least 7 days (one week) in Kenya.

If you want to get even more out of your time in Kenya then I’d recommend going for 10 days.

In this article, I am including itineraries for both options – one if you want to visit for a week and an extension of the itinerary, if you have enough time for 10 days.

Lilac breasted roller bird in the Masai Mara
A beautiful lilac breasted roller in the Masai Mara

Kenya Safari Logistics

When booking your trip with a local tour operator, they will take care of much of your trip. However, there are still a few things that you’ll need to consider and organise.

Visa

As of January 2024, you no longer need a visa to travel to Kenya. You do however need to apply online for an Electronic Travel Authorisation (eTA) to visit. You’ll need to apply in advance of your trip. There are a couple of exemptions – you can find a full list here.

You can view up to date entry requirements based on your country below.

A young hyena in the Masai Mara
A young hyena in the Masai Mara

Vaccinations

You need to have been vaccinated against Yellow Fever to enter Kenya as Kenya has a risk of Yellow Fever. You’ll need to bring your yellow vaccination certificate with you to Kenya as proof of your vaccination.

There are other recommended vaccinations that you have before your trip. You can view a list of them here.

Medication

Kenya has a risk of malaria. Therefore it’s advised that you take anti-malarial medication for the duration of your stay in Kenya. I’d recommend talking to a medical professional about which medication is right for you.

You can get quotes from the same local tour companies I use to organise my own trips here: Safaris By Ella

A hartebeest in the Masai Mara at golden hour
A hartebeest in the Masai Mara at golden hour

Kenya Safari Itinerary Overview

I have crafted the perfect 7-10 day Kenya safari itinerary below based on both my personal experience and after conducting copious research on the topic.

The itinerary features my absolute favourite national parks and reserves in Kenya where you are pretty much guaranteed to get good wildlife sightings.

I have also considered the distance between the parks and driving times in order to come up with the most enjoyable itinerary.

So without further adieu, let’s dive in!

A male lion, one of the dominant males of the Topi Pride in the Masai Mara
A male lion, one of the dominant males of the Topi Pride in the Masai Mara

Day by Day Breakdown of the Ultimate 7-10 Day Kenya Safari Itinerary

Day 1: Nairobi

Total drive time: dependent on what activities you choose to do on this day

Your adventure starts in Nairobi, Kenya’s capital and the gateway to the country’s natural parks. Most safari tour operators are based in this colourful city and will meet you at the airport.

Depending on what time your flight arrives, you can either spend the day exploring or get transferred to your accommodation.

About Nairobi

Nairobi is a vibrant, bustling city which is home to over 4 million people. The name comes from the Maasai phrase ‘Enkare Nairobi’ which means ‘place of cool waters’, a reminder that the city was built on a swamp.

Nairobi is one of the biggest cities in Africa which makes it extremely varied in its food scene and things to do.

The city has a reputation as being a little rough around the edges. However, if you apply common sense and don’t visit any unusual neighbourhoods, you should have a pleasant time in the city. I’ll go into more detail in my ‘tips for visiting Nairobi’ section below.

Where to Stay in Nairobi

When you book your safari with a local tour operator, often your hotel in Nairobi is included in your package. However, this isn’t always the case. Fortunately, Nairobi has a vast number of lovely accommodation options available which don’t break the bank.

I personally recommend Airbnbs in Nairobi. There are a number available, both within the centre and slightly out of town. My favourite area to stay is Karen in the south which is leafy and relaxed. There are a number of highly-rated properties here, including this one.

Airbnb in Karen, Nairobi
Airbnb in Karen, Nairobi

Things to do in Nairobi

There are a wide range of things to do in Nairobi! Below are some of my favourites.

1. Nairobi National Park

Situated just below the central business district is an area of pristine wilderness known as Nairobi National Park. I find it fascinating how a pocket of nature and a busy city centre can coexist side by side.

Nairobi National Park is the only national park that exists within a capital city. At 117 sq km in size, it’s one of Africa’s smallest parks which means it can easily be explored within one day.

In my opinion, Nairobi National Park is well worth a visit, if only to view wildlife in front of towering skyscrapers. It’s quite a contrast to animals and skyscrapers in one frame and is certainly thought-provoking.

Nairobi National Park has all the Big Five (elephants, lions, rhinos, leopards and buffalos) as well as giraffes, cheetahs, hyenas and much more.

Zebras in Nairobi National Park with the city in the background
Zebras in Nairobi National Park with the city in the background
2. The Giraffe Centre

If you’re an avid Instagram user then you’ll have no doubt seen glamorous photographs and videos of Giraffe Manor, a fabulous luxury hotel where you can feed giraffes from your balcony. Well, did you know you can get a similar experience with the very same giraffes that visit Giraffe Manor for only a fraction of the price?

20 kilometres outside the centre of Nairobi is the Giraffe Centre, a sanctuary that supports the conservation of the rare Rothschild giraffe. It’s part of the same establishment as the world-famous Giraffe Manor.

I’m very sceptical recommending wildlife sanctuaries as often establishments claim they are sanctuaries but in reality are anything but and are purely in existence for human entertainment and profit.

However, the Giraffe Centre is a true sanctuary and has had a very positive impact on the population of Rothschild giraffes in Kenya, introducing a number of breeding pairs into various parks across the country, including Lake Nakuru National Park, Mwea National Reserve, Ruma National Park and Nasalot National Reserve.

It’s with the sanctuary’s help that the number of Rothschild giraffes have increased from 120 to over 300 individuals.

Not only does a visit to the Giraffe Centre support a worthwhile cause, but it’s really fun too! 

Upon arrival you will be given a coconut shell full of pellets that the giraffes go wild for. You will then have the opportunity to feed these pellets to some of the sanctuary’s resident giraffes. Some of the giraffes are a little more polite than others when taking the pellets – be prepared for some giraffe slobber and watch out for Daisy the headbutting giraffe!

You only need to spend 1-2 hours at the Giraffe Centre. There is a nature trail on the other side of the road, should you wish to stay longer.

Ella McKendrick feeding a giraffe at the Giraffe Centre in Nairobi
Me feeding a giraffe at the Giraffe Centre in Nairobi
3. David Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage

David Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage is another conservation initiative based in Nairobi that is doing genuinely good work for wildlife. The orphanage rescues baby elephants around Kenya who are often victims of poaching or human-wildlife conflict. The goal is to raise the elephants and then release them back into the wild. The sanctuary has a track record of releasing numerous elephants successfully back into the wild.

As well as helping elephants, Sheldrick Wildlife Trust also rescues black rhinos and giraffes. Additionally, the trust has helped to fund a lot of anti-poaching units across Kenya and has built permanent water sources in national parks for wildlife to help tackle droughts.

You can visit the elephant orphanage in Nairobi National Park and witness the daily feeding of the baby elephants. This takes place between 11am and 12pm each day and you can only visit if you book in advance. All information on how to book can be found on Sheldrick Wildlife Trust’s website here.

As mentioned above, I never recommend sanctuaries that cause harm to animals. Sheldrick Wildlife Trust permits no contact with the animals and only allows one hour-long visit per day, limiting the impact on the animals in their care.

Baby elephants playing at David Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage in Nairobi
Baby elephants playing at David Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage in Nairobi
4. Dine in one of Nairobi’s Delicious Restaurants

Nairobi has a lot of fabulous restaurants for you to enjoy.

My absolute favourite is ‘Talisman Restaurant’ in Karan which is open for both lunch and dinner. It serves a range of Asian-inspired dishes including sushi (my favourite)!

A unique restaurant in Nairobi is ‘Carnivore Restaurant’ which is famous all over the world. The restaurant is all-you-can-eat and you wave a white flag on your table until you’re stuffed. Various kinds of meat (including crocodile and ox balls) are brought to you, served on Maasai swords. It’s certainly an experience but I’d only recommend it if you’re a big meat lover and have a massive appetite. I love meat but can never eat too much so it didn’t feel like good value for me as it’s a fixed price to eat here.

Other restaurant recommendations that I have are ‘The Wine Shop’ and ‘Wasp and Sprout’, both in Loresho.

Lamb koftas, homemade hummus and flatbread at the Talisman Restaurant in Karen, Nairobi
Lamb koftas, homemade hummus and flatbread at the Talisman Restaurant in Karen, Nairobi

Tips for Visiting Nairobi

I absolutely loved my time in Nairobi! The city is extremely easy to get around. Ubers are reasonably priced and are everywhere and food can easily be ordered to your door on Uber Eats.

However, as with every large city, you should express some caution.

First of all, don’t walk around with any valuables on display. This is general advice that I would give for visiting any city. Most crimes are opportunistic so don’t give anyone an easy opportunity. I never travel with expensive jewellery and avoid walking down streets with my phone out. I’d recommend using a bum bag / fanny pack so you can safely store your phone and passport on you whilst you’re out.

Another important tip is to avoid being out at night. There are two reasons for this. Firstly, most crime happens at night and secondly, most car accidents happen at night. Therefore I recommend planning your days so that you don’t need to be out after dark.

There are neighbourhoods in Nairobi that should be avoided such as Eastleigh and Kibera. Taxi drivers and Ubers know which areas to avoid so this shouldn’t be a problem.

Additionally, I’d recommend Ubering to places rather than walking. Walking down the streets of Nairobi can become exhausting quite quickly as you’ll no doubt encounter a host of people trying to sell you tours, souvenirs and more. I’m someone who easily feels harassed so I opt instead to take Ubers where possible, even if it’s down a stretch which would equate to a 15 minute walk. Ubers are relatively inexpensive so to me it makes sense to utilise them in order to have a much more pleasant experience.

Nairobi city skyline in the evening
Nairobi city skyline in the evening

My Personal Experience in Nairobi

I’ll be honest, before I visited Nairobi, I was pretty nervous. Friends and family members who had never visited before warned me against staying in Nairobi, claiming it’s dangerous. But after staying in the city for a week, I can now see that their beliefs were based on a Nairobi of the past and the city has come a long way in recent years.

Yes, you have to be cautious when in Nairobi, like with any major city but I personally never felt unsafe there. Perhaps this is because I never put myself in a position where I could be unsafe as I didn’t go out after dark and I didn’t visit unusual neighbourhoods.

The security in Nairobi is extremely high. All of the Airbnbs that I stayed at had 24/7 security and all restaurants and shopping centres that I visited were secured behind gates. All of this made me feel safe.

I ventured into central Nairobi and walked from one of my Airbnbs to a local restaurant and I felt safe and comfortable for both of these activities. Everyone that I encountered was extremely friendly.

The food in Nairobi actually exceeded my expectations. There’s an abundance of restaurants which serve a range of different cuisines and I found the standard of food was high.

I was also impressed with how easy it is to get around Nairobi and to order deliveries. Uber Eats can even deliver your shopping to your door!

Overall, I had an extremely good experience in Nairobi and I’m keen to return again in future.

Baby topis at sunrise in the Masai Mara National Reserve
Baby topis at sunrise in the Masai Mara National Reserve

Day 2: Masai Mara

Driving time (excluding game drives): 6 hours

Today you will leave the bustling city of Nairobi and journey to my favourite spot in Kenya – the world-famous Masai Mara National Reserve.

Half of your day will be spent driving to the Masai Mara. The rest of your day will be spent on a game drive within the beautiful reserve.

Itinerary

I’d highly recommend starting your day early (setting off at 7am or 8am) so that you have time for an afternoon game drive in the Masai Mara.

Now, the Masai Mara is a little far away from other safari destinations in Kenya, not conveniently on a loop like Tanzania’s safari destinations are, so it is a little bit of a detour from the rest of the itinerary to get here. But in my opinion it’s well worth making the effort to visit as it is Kenya’s flagship reserve.

It takes roughly 6 hours from Nairobi to reach the Talek Gate, one of a number of entrances into the main reserve. The Talek Gate is just outside the town of Talek which is where you will find most of the Masai Mara’s safari lodges.

The 6 hour driving time accounts for a stop-off at the Rift Valley Viewpoint around 1.5-2 hours into your journey and a second stop in Narok, the closest large town to the Masai Mara, around 3.5 hours into the drive.

If you set off at 7am or 8am then you should arrive at your lodge in time for a delicious lunch.

You can then spend the afternoon on a safari in the Masai Mara National Reserve.

Mother cheetah, Nashipai, in the Masai Mara
Mother cheetah, Nashipai, in the Masai Mara

About Masai Mara

The Masai Mara is one of the most famous safari destinations in the world. This sprawling expanse of grasslands is home to an abundance of wildlife, including the Big Five (lions, elephants, leopards, rhinos and buffalos).

The Masai Mara is perhaps most famous for hosting the annual wildebeest migration between mid-July and mid-September. Each year millions of wildebeest cross over from the Serengeti National Park, just south of the Masai Mara, into the Masai Mara, in search of fresh grazing. As part of their journey, they have to cross the mighty Mara River which is teeming with hungry crocodiles.

The Masai Mara is also well-known for its high density of predators. Lions, cheetahs, leopards and hyenas all live here in healthy numbers. In fact the Masai Mara is one of the best places in the world to see them.

The reserve is part of the wider Serengeti ecosystem which together make up one of the largest areas of natural wilderness in Africa. There are no boundaries at all surrounding the Masai Mara meaning that animals can freely move as they like.

Hyena feeding on a topi kill, surrounded by vultures, in the Masai Mara
Hyena feeding on a topi kill, surrounded by vultures, in the Masai Mara

Tips for Your Masai Mara Afternoon Game Drive

The prime times to go on safari are either early in the morning or late in the afternoon. This is when it’s cooler and the animals are most active. You are however limited by the reserve’s opening times.

Today you are going on an afternoon safari so I’d recommend staying in the park right until it closes at 6pm. Not only do the evenings offer superior wildlife viewing opportunities, but the lighting is really beautiful at this time of day as well.

Tsetse flies are common in the Masai Mara so I’d recommend lathering yourself in insect repellent before your game drives. I also like to bring the repellent with me, just in case I need to top-up. Tsetse flies are attracted to dark coloured clothing (blacks and navy blues) so be sure to wear lighter colours such as whites, beiges or greens. Do avoid bright colours however.

Ella McKendrick on safari in the Masai Mara
Me on safari in the Masai Mara. Notice how I’m wearing light neural colours

Where to Spend the Night

The Talek region just outside the Masai Mara’s Talek gate houses a number of safari lodges and tented camps. This is a great place to spend the night as it’s just a short drive to the gate each day and there are a range of accommodation options available.

Another popular area to spend the night is near Ololaimutiek Village which is further south. This is also very close to one of the Masai Mara’s entrance gates. The driving time to get here is longer than it is to Talek so for that reason, I’d be inclined to recommend staying in Talek so that you have more time for a safari.

There are a couple of lodges located within the Masai Mara itself but they are typically more expensive and the park fees for staying within the park are higher.

Little Zebra River Camp is a favourite camp of mine which is located within Talek
Little Zebra River Camp is a favourite camp of mine which is located within Talek

My Personal Experience in the Masai Mara

I absolutely loved my time in the Masai Mara. The landscape itself is exceptionally beautiful, an endless plain except for the odd acacia tree. The density of wildlife however is what makes it one of the best places to go on safari.

Over my week in the Masai Mara I managed to see all of the Big Five as well as seven cheetahs, countless hyenas and much more. I saw more lions than I can count, many of which were on kills. Apart from the Serengeti, there’s nowhere else where I have seen so many predators.

A lioness from Notch Pride in the Masai Mara
A lioness from Notch Pride in the Masai Mara

Day 3: Masai Mara

Driving time (excluding game drives): 0 hours

Today you have a full day to go on safari and enjoy the magic of the Masai Mara!

Itinerary

Arguably the best time to go on safari is the early morning. Therefore you’ll want to ensure you wake up early so that you can go on safari as soon as the reserve’s gates open at 6am. This means you may have to wake up at 5am or 5:30am, depending on how far your lodge is from the gate.

Take a packed breakfast and lunch with you from the lodge so that you can eat these on your safari. The Masai Mara currently operates on pay per entry permits meaning if you were to go back to your lodge and eat for breakfast and lunch before going back on a game drive, you’d have to pay for your permits again.

You’ll then be able to enjoy a full-day game drive in the Masai Mara. If you have the stamina, I’d highly recommend staying until the park shuts at 6pm. This gives you maximum viewing time and, as wildlife doesn’t run on a schedule, gives you the most opportunities to witness some incredible sightings. The more time you spend on safari, the higher the chances of seeing something exciting.

After your safari, you’ll then return to your lodge for the evening.

Zebras grazing in the Masai Mara at sunrise
Zebras grazing in the Masai Mara at sunrise

Tips for Your Full-Day Masai Mara Game Drive

The temperatures can vary quite dramatically throughout the day in East Africa so I’d recommend wearing multiple layers. Mornings can be chilly so it makes sense to wear jumpers and jackets. However, the middle of the day can in contrast become sweltering, so you’ll want to be able to strip down to a lightweight vest top or T-shirt.

Sunscreen and insect repellent are my two must-have items for every safari I go on. There’s a good chance you’ll need to top up on both at some point throughout the day so it’s essential to have them on hand. Even if it’s cloudy, you can still get sunburnt in Kenya so wear sunscreen every day.

As mentioned above, go on your game drive as early as possible. Big cats especially are active in the mornings so being out at this time gives you the best chance to spot them.

Don’t forget to let your guide know the day before that you plan on doing a full-day game drive and would like to eat breakfast and lunch on the safari. He will then arrange with your lodge for you to have a packed breakfast and lunch made for you and he’ll be ready and waiting to leave with you first thing in the morning.

Where to Spend the Night

Spend the night in the same lodge in the Masai Mara that you spent the previous night.

Leopard with a gazelle kill in the Masai Mara
Leopard with a gazelle kill in the Masai Mara

Day 4: Lake Naivasha or Hell’s Gate National Park

Driving time (excluding game drives): 5 hours

This morning you will leave the Masai Mara and journey to Lake Naivasha, a large freshwater lake that’s teeming with life, including hippos and flamingos. It’s one of the best places in Kenya to enjoy a boat safari.

Alternatively, you can visit Hell’s Gate National Park for a cycling safari. The national park is right next door to Lake Naivasha.

Lake Naivasha Itinerary

This morning you’ll depart from your lodge in Masai Mara and journey to Lake Naivasha or Hell’s Gate National Park. The drive will take between 5 and 6 hours and involves journeying on a combination of bumpy dirt roads and tarred roads.

You will arrive in Lake Naivasha in time for some lunch at your lodge. Most lodges are located not far from the lake’s edge.

After lunch you will then get to see the beauty of Lake Naivasha from the comfort of a boat. Boating safaris give you a unique perspective of wildlife. You’ll also be able to marvel at Naivasha’s sizable population of over 1,500 hippos. The lake is also home to over 400 species of birds.

Your boat will stop on Crescent Island where you can then enjoy a walking safari. You can find a number of animals on this island, including zebras, gazelles, wildebeest and giraffes.

Yawning Hippo in Central Serengeti
Yawning hippo

About Lake Naivasha

Lake Naivasha is a large 139km² freshwater lake within East Africa’s Rift Valley. It’s in fact the Rift Valley’s highest lake, standing at 1884m above sea level. The name ‘Naivasha’ derives from the Maasai word for ‘rough water’ which refers to the fact that the area is frequented by storms.

The lake is one of the best places in Kenya to see hippos up-close and is also a haven for bird lovers, due to the vast array of species that can be seen here.

Hell’s Gate National Park Itinerary

Just below Lake Naivasha is Hell’s Gate National Park. The close proximity of the two attractions means that the start of this itinerary is the same as the Lake Naivasha one. 

After having lunch at your lodge near Lake Naivasha, you will enter Hell’s Gate National Park and embark on a cycling safari.

On your tour you will have the chance to admire the park’s unique terrain and rock formations, evidence of the high levels of geothermal activity here. Additionally the park is home to a number of species of wildlife, including buffalos, zebras, elands, baboons and other species of antelope.

Unique landscape of Hell's Gate National Park
Unique landscape of Hell’s Gate National Park

About Hell’s Gate National Park

Hell’s Gate is a small national park (68.25 square kilometres) that’s renowned for its unique scenery which includes towering cliffs, rocky pinnacles, deep gorges and magnificent volcanoes. The park also houses an abundance of wildlife.

Hell’s Gate is one of the only national parks that allows walking and cycling safaris.

Where to Spend the Night

There are a number of lodges located on Lake Naivasha’s southern banks.

Elephant herd in Amboseli
Elephant herd in Amboseli

Day 5: Amboseli

Driving time (excluding game drives): 6 hours

Today you will journey to my favourite national park in Kenya (Masai Mara is a national reserve so I’m not contradicting myself here!) – Amboseli. Amboseli is famed for its huge herds of elephants and for having exceptional views of Mount Kilimanjaro, the tallest mountain in Africa.

By having a permanent year-round water source at its heart, Amboseli always has a plethora of wildlife for you to admire, no matter what the season. The star attractions here are Amboseli’s ‘big tuskers’, elephants with huge tusks that weigh over 50kg and touch the ground. Amboseli and neighbouring Tsavo West National Park are home to the last big tuskers in the world.

Itinerary

Today you have another relatively lengthy drive ahead of you. It takes roughly 6 hours to reach Amboseli from Lake Naivasha. The roads are mostly tarred and in good condition and you will have to pass by Nairobi on your way.

I’d recommend leaving Lake Naivasha at around 8am so that you can have lunch at your lodge in Amboseli at 2pm before heading out on an afternoon game drive in Amboseli.

Amboseli National Park’s gates close at 6pm so you have the time to have a 3 hour afternoon game drive.

This is in fact one of the best times of day to go on safari in Amboseli as it’s around this time that Amboseli’s huge elephant herds migrate from the swamp in the centre of the park to the forests below Kilimanjaro.

You’ll be able to witness hundreds of elephants crossing the road in front of you, a sight that is guaranteed to take your breath away. And, if conditions are just right, you’ll be able to see them walk in front of Mount Kilimanjaro and capture the perfect photograph.

Sadly, Kilimanjaro hid from me for the entirety of my recent 5 day safari in Amboseli but I did visit in the rainy season which likely impacted my opportunity.

You’ll return to your lodge for the evening at 6pm.

A mother elephant and her baby in Amboseli National Park
A mother elephant and her baby in Amboseli National Park

About Amboseli

The name Amboseli comes from the Maasai word ‘Empusel’ which means ‘salty dust place’. This description is especially true of Lake Amboseli in the dry season.

Amboseli is relatively small in comparison to the Masai Mara, measuring 392.06 km2 in size and can easily be explored within 24 hours. Lake Amboseli, in the heart of the park, makes up a good proportion of the park. In the dry season this lake runs dry and you can drive across it. However in the rainy season, the lake fills up and makes access to the west of the park limited.

Most wildlife sightings in Amboseli can be seen on the east of the park which is conveniently the side near most lodges.

Amboseli is home to some of the largest herds of African elephants in the world. The elephant population is so strong here because the area is inhabited by the Maasai tribe. The Maasai have a reputation for being fearsome warriors and their very presence has kept poachers away and thus conserved the elephant population.

You can expect to see a great deal of wildlife in Amboseli. Lions, buffalos, cheetahs, giraffes and hyenas can all be found here. However, rhinos and leopards are absent from the park so you cannot see all of the Big Five here.

Lion cub in Amboseli National Park
Lion cub in Amboseli National Park

Tips for Visiting Amboseli

If you wish to catch a glimpse of Mount Kilimanjaro, visiting in Tanzania’s long dry season will give you the best chances as there should be less cloud cover. The long dry season runs between June and the end of September.

The best times to view Amboseli’s elephants is either in the morning (around 7am) or in the evening (around 5pm) as these are the times when the elephants journey to and from the swamps in the heart of Amboseli. In the middle of the day, the elephants relax in the swamp and sightings are not as good. It’s much better to see them when they are on the move.

Be sensible when around the elephants. Although they don’t mind the presence of vehicles, causing a lot of noise could disturb them.

Amboseli is one of the hottest national parks in Kenya so dress prepared for heat in the middle of the day. Also be sure to put on ample sunscreen.

Where to Spend the Night

There are three safari lodges located within Amboseli National Park. Staying within the park always allows you more time on safari as you don’t need to make the journey to the park gates.

However, in the case of Amboseli, most lodges outside the park are only a short distance from the gate. Additionally, the elephants cross the road to and from the swamp not far from Kimana Gate, so it’s probably a similar distance journeying here from all lodges, including those within the park.

When choosing a lodge outside the park, you’ll definitely want to stay in one near Kimana Gate which is on the east of the park. Most lodges are located here.

I stayed at Tulia Amboseli Camp and thoroughly enjoyed my stay there.

Ella McKendrick in plunge pool at Amboseli Tulia Camp
Me enjoying a refreshing dip in my private plunge pool at Amboseli Tulia Camp

My Experience in Amboseli

Amboseli National Park exceeded my expectations. I was expecting elephants but I hadn’t quite contemplated the scale of the herds in Amboseli. Having seen elephants in quite a few locations now, including on safari in Tanzania, I thought I knew what to expect from elephant encounters. I was however wrong.

Amboseli has without a doubt provided me with my best elephant experience to date. The herds are huge and are made up of impressive individuals. Even the female elephants have longer tusks than I’m used to seeing. It’s also incredible how close to the vehicles they cross the road and the sheer quantity that cross at once is something to behold.

The only thing missing from my incredible elephant sightings was a view of Kilimanjaro in the background. A dark grey cloud stood behind the elephants and I knew that behind this was the mountain. Still, not seeing Kilimanjaro was a small price to pay for having such a beautiful experience.

Amboseli is not just elephants. I wasn’t expecting to have many big cat sightings as it’s not what the park is known for but I had some of my best cheetah sightings in this park.

I witnessed two males successfully chase and catch an impala shortly followed by a female swiftly take down a baby gazelle. After gulping down a hearty portion in a short space of time, she sadly lost her kill to a hyena. However she wasn’t done yet. I was amazed when she then chased an impala just metres away from our vehicle. She was unsuccessful this time, likely because she had an extremely full stomach which was slowing her down.

I also had some amazing lion sightings in Amboseli too, including of tiny cubs which must have only been a couple of weeks old, squabbling over their mother’s milk.

Can you tell that I love Amboseli?

Male cheetah on the hunt in Amboseli National Park
Male cheetah on the hunt in Amboseli National Park. Alongside his brother, he took down an impala

Day 6: Amboseli

Driving time (excluding game drives): 0 hours

Today you will enjoy a full day in Amboseli. You’ll embark on a safari from 6am till 3pm and then you will have some time to relax at your lodge.

Itinerary

Today you will have another safari in Amboseli. Wake up early so that you can be at the gates to the park at 6am. This will give you enough time to venture into the park and be ready for the elephants as they cross into the swamp.

Early morning safaris also give you the best opportunity to spot predators such as lions and cheetahs.

After a morning on safari you will then stop at Observation Hill in the centre of the park where you can enjoy your picnic lunch with panoramic views over the park.

You will then continue your safari before exiting the park just before 3pm. Park passes are valid for a 24 hour period so, assuming you have a safari the previous day starting at 3pm, you will then need to leave before 3pm today.

You will then have some time to relax at your lodge.

Where to Spend the Night

You will spend another night in Amboseli.

Elephants in Amboseli National Park
Elephants in Amboseli National Park

Day 7: Return to Nairobi Or Tsavo West

Driving time for option 1 (excluding game drives): 5 hours

Driving time for option 2 (excluding game drives): 4 hours

If you are visiting Kenya for a 7 day safari then today you will leave Amboseli and journey back to Nairobi. The journey will take around 5 hours. You can then spend the afternoon either exploring or relaxing before your journey home.

If you are extending your itinerary into a 10 day safari, today you will be visiting Tsavo West National Park.

Itinerary option 1 (for 7 day Kenya safari)

This morning you will leave your lodge in Amboseli. The drive takes between 4 and 5 hours so I’d recommend leaving in the morning between 8am and 9am so that you can arrive in Nairobi at lunch time.

Enjoy some lunch in Nairobi and you then have the afternoon to do as you please. You may decide to do some more explorations of Nairobi (refer to my best things to do in Nairobi here) or simply relax before you fly home.

Itinerary option 2 (for 10 day Kenya safari)

This morning you will journey to Tsavo West National Park which is around a 4 hour drive from Amboseli. 

You’ll arrive in Tsavo West in time for lunch either at your lodge or as a picnic.

You’ll then embark on an afternoon game drive within the national park before venturing to your lodge for the night after the park gate’s close at 6pm.

Black rhino and ostrich in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya
Rare black rhino in Kenya

About Tsavo West

Tsavo West is part of Kenya’s largest National Park called Tsavo which is split into two parts (East and West) by a highway and railway line. Tsavo West is the most popular of the two, partly due to the stunning landscapes as well as the array of wildlife you can find there.

Tsavo West is particularly famous for being one of the best places to see black rhinos.

Additionally, Tsavo is known for its lions, particularly for housing the maneaters of Tsavo who caused havoc in 1898, killing dozens of railway construction workers. Whilst the maneaters of Tsavo may not be alive today, it’s still thrilling to see their descendants.

As well as having a fascinating history, the lions of Tsavo are also interesting to see as unlike most lions, the male lions here don’t grow manes. There are two theories for this. Firstly, it’s hotter in Tsavo than other regions so perhaps having thick manes would be too hot for the lions. Secondly, the vegetation is denser in Tsavo so perhaps it was impractical to have a large mane as it’s more likely to snag on thorns.

The landscape in Tsavo West is also unique. Shetani Lava Flows (a great expanse of folded lava) and Mzima Springs (natural volcanic springs which house a number of hippos) are two key attractions within the park.

Male lion in Amboseli National Park, Kenya
Male lion – notice he doesn’t have a full mane

Tips for Visiting Tsavo West

The best time to visit Tsavo West is in the dry season, particularly between June and October. In the wet season, the roads can become impassable.

On my most recent trip to Kenya which took place in November 2023 I was meant to be visiting Tsavo West but due to large amounts of rain roads both to the park and within it were completely flooded and I was forced to skip it from my itinerary. My driver was able to communicate with another vehicle within the park only to find that many routes within the park were closed, making it difficult to have a safari there.

Where to Spend the Night

Spend the night in a tented camp or lodge that’s either within Tsavo West National Park or just outside it. There are camps on all sides of the park.

Zebras in the Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya
Two zebras. They stand like this to get a panoramic view of their surroundings and look-out for predators

Day 8: Tsavo West & Diani Beach

Driving time (excluding game drives): 5 hours

After a week of exciting safaris, it’s time to unwind on Kenya’s scenic coastline. There’s still time for one last game drive this morning before you venture to the coast.

Itinerary

This morning you’ll enjoy a game drive in Tsavo West National Park. I’d recommend a game drive that starts early in the morning (6am) as this gives you the best chance to see predators and rhinos.

You can have an early picnic lunch within the park before journeying to Diani Beach.

Diani Beach is around a 5 hour drive from Tsavo West National Park. You should arrive in Diani by late afternoon, in time for a spot of relaxation on the beach.

About Diani Beach

Often touted as one of the best beaches in Kenya, Diani lies 30 km south of the bustling city of Mombasa. Diani looks like something straight off a postcard, white-sand beaches fringed by lazy palm trees, crystal clear waters lapping against the shore. 

The beach is backed by an array of resorts and restaurants, tucked neatly behind vervent foliage.

Diani beach has been voted as the best beach in Africa for 5 years in a row due to not only its beauty but the number of things to do here such as jetskiing, kitesurfing, stand-up paddleboarding, snorkelling and scuba diving. In fact, it’s often classed as one of the best kitesurfing spots in Kenya.

Where to Spend the Night

There are a number of hotels and guesthouses which sit behind Diani beach and have supreme views of the ocean. Additionally, there’s a number of hotels just behind the beachfront.

I’d recommend booking into a hotel which is right on the beach so that you can enjoy fabulous views from the comfort of your hotel.

Diani Beach on Kenya's coast
Diani Beach on Kenya’s coast

Day 9: Diani Beach

Driving time (excluding game drives): 0 hours

You have a full day to unwind in Diani. Perhaps you wish to spend the day relaxing on the beach, maybe a cocktail in hand, or maybe you want to explore the area and see the key sights of Diani.

Below I have listed some of my favourite things to do in Diani.

What to do in Diani

Snorkelling

The waters off the coast of Diani are perfect for a spot of snorkelling due to the clarity of the water and the presence of coral reefs. The best place in Diani for snorkelling is Nomad Beach, just in front of Nomad Beach Bar & Restaurant. 

Dining

There are a number of fabulous restaurants in Diani including Nomad Beach Bar & Restaurant and Ali Barbour’s Cave Restaurant, some of the top rated restaurants in the area.

Shimba Hills National Reserve

If you’re not quite finished with safaris yet, Shimba Hills National Reserve is one of the largest coastal forests in East Africa. It’s home to elephants, giraffes, leopards, hyenas, waterbuck and much more. The most notable resident is the Sable Antelope.

You can go on game drives within the reserve.

Colobus Conservation Centre

Colobus Conservation is a non-profit organisation dedicated to conserving the rare Colobus monkey. On a visit to the centre you can go on a guided nature walk where you can hope to encounter a troop of Colobus monkeys as well as other primates such as vervet monkeys, baboons and skye monkeys.

The Colobus Centre is open every day apart from Sunday between 8:30am and 4:30pm.

Where to Spend the Night

Spend another night on Diani Beach.

Camels on Diani Beach in Kenya
Camels on Diani Beach

Day 10: Return to Nairobi

Driving time (excluding game drives): 10 hours

On your final day in Kenya, you will journey from Diani Beach back to Nairobi.

There are two ways to get back to Nairobi: by road or by plane.

Journeying by road takes roughly 10 hours, making it a lengthy travel day. The time is heavily dependent on traffic as the highway between Mombasa and Nairobi is currently single carriageway so it could potentially take longer.

However, driving isn’t the only option. You can take a flight from Ukunda Airport in Diani to either Wilson Airport or Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, both of which are in Nairobi. The flight takes just over an hour and typically costs between $45 and $70 per person.

Itinerary

If you’re driving back to Nairobi then I’d recommend leaving as early as possible to account for any delays in the road. Setting off at 7am means that you should arrive in Nairobi at 5pm when it’s still light. You want to avoid driving at night where possible and sunset is around 6:30pm. Because Kenya is on the equator, sunset is at a similar time throughout the year.

Flying from Diani to Nairobi is a lot easier. There are a number of flights that take place throughout the day, some in the morning and others in the afternoon. As the flight time is so short, you have time to relax in Diani before your flight and in Nairobi afterwards.

I’d personally recommend opting to fly to Nairobi rather than driving. Flights are relatively inexpensive and will save you a lot of time.

Recommended Booking Options For Your 7-10 Day Kenya Safari

Private Safari

Most popular & best experience – typical prices start from $300 per person per day.

Visit safarisbyella.com for free quotes from trustworthy local tour companies I use to book my own trips.

Ella Mckendrick with lions in Serengeti

Group (Shared) Camping Safari

Good for budget or solo travellers – from $160 per person per day.

My recommended Kenya tour operators only provide private safaris, however, I’ve listed the best group options for this itinerary, on Safari Bookings below.

Click the links below to request quotes for the group safari options on the safari bookings website.

7-Day Kenya Budget Group Safari Option 1

7-Day Kenya Budget Group Safari Option 2

10-Day Kenya Budget Group Safari

Final thoughts

Kenya is a fantastic destination for an African safari. The country houses an array of national parks and reserves, each teeming with life. I’ve had some of my favourite safari experiences in Kenya!

A 7 day safari allows you to visit Kenya’s highlights, namely the Masai Mara and Amboseli. Just visiting these two parks alone will give you some fantastic safari experiences.

If you have more time, then a 10 day safari allows you to visit Tsavo West before relaxing on Kenya’s most beautiful beach. Visiting Kenya’s coastline allows you to see another side to the country and to enjoy a bout of relaxation after your safari.

If you’re still undecided about where to go on your African safari, you may be interested in reading my 7-10 day Tanzania safari itinerary. Tanzania is right next door to Kenya and safaris are a similar cost. I personally love both locations equally as each country has something different to offer.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.